Making Democracy Work

Action and Advocacy

Contact your Legislators and speak up on issues important to you.

Action and Advocacy

The League of Women Voters takes action on an issue or advocates for a cause when there is an existing League position that supports the issue or speaks to the cause.

Positions result from a process of study. Any given study, whether it be National, State, or Local, is thorough in its pursuit of facts and details. As the study progresses, a continuing discussion of pros and cons of each situation occurs. Prior to the results of the study being presented to the general membership, study committee members fashion consensus questions that are then addressed by the membership.

Additional discussion, pro and con, takes place as members (not part of the study committee) learn the scope of the study. After the members reach consensus, the board forms positions based on that consensus.

It is the consensus statement -- the statement resulting from the consensus questions -- that becomes a position. Firm action or advocacy can then be taken on the particular issue addressed by the position. Without a position, action/advocacy cannot be taken.

Carlsbad Unit speaks to Carlsbad City Council regarding Caruso Project

Recently, Mary Thompson presented this statement to the Carlsbad City Council regarding the review process being taken on the Caruso project:

As a matter in the public interest, the board of directors of the League of Women Voters North County San Diego has reviewed the Agua Hedionda South Shore Specific Plan, also referred to as the Agua Hedionda 85/15 Plan, being put forward by Caruso Development for a proposed shopping mall on the `strawberry fields' adjacent to the Agua Hedionda Lagoon.    The League's concern is not on the merits of the project.  Rather, our concern is that the normal project approval process has not been followed. Based on our positions of accessibility in the initiative process, adherence to general plans in growth management at the local level, and use of democratic means in sustainable governance decisions, the League believes the proposed project needs the normal comprehensive staff review, independent third party review to evaluate compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), and opportunities for public input.     The League of Women Voters supports informed decisions by the voters.  The League urges the City Council to put the "Carlsbad Agua Hedionda Initiative" on the ballot and call for a special election, which will allow time for all citizens to review and fully consider this project.

In addition the letter below was sent to the Editor of the San Diego Union-Tribune. To date, it hasn't been printed.

The League of Women Voters North County San Diego urges the Carlsbad City Council to put the citizens' initiative referred to as the Agua Hedionda 85/15 Plan before the voters in a special election. The League's concern is not on the merits of the project, but that the normal project approval process has not been followed: comprehensive staff review, independent third party review to evaluate compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), and opportunities for public input.

The League supports informed decisions by all voters on matters of public interest--not just the voters who may have signed a petition.

The Voting Rights Act

Forty-eight years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the historic Voting Rights Act (VRA) into law. Unfortunately, earlier this summer the U.S. Supreme Court erased fundamental protections against racial discrimination in voting that have been critical in protecting our democracy.

The damage to the VRA can and must be fixed. Congress has the power to act swiftly to restore the effectiveness of the Voting Rights Act. Tell your members of Congress to work quickly to repair and restore the VRA.

Before adjourning for the August recess, both the Senate and the House of Representatives held hearings to begin discussing solutions to discrimination at the polls and the path forward for the VRA. We were encouraged by what we witnessed + members from both sides of the aisle expressing a need to address the Supreme Court's mistake and vowing to ensure our elections are free, fair and accessible to all citizens.

Following the Supreme Court's decision, we've seen an all-out attack on voting rights across the country. States like Texas that had been subjected to the VRA's federal pre-approval process took steps to implement their photo voter ID laws nearly immediately. North Carolina pushed through an omnibus voter suppression package that the Governor has pledged to sign. If it becomes law, it would impose a photo voter ID component, restrict early voting, cut preregistration for 16 and 17 year olds, eliminate same day registration and much more.

The League will continue to pursue all avenues to fight for voters' rights, but we need strong action by Congress to restore the Voting Rights Act protections that have helped us prevent racial and language discrimination in our elections for decades.